Category Archives for SYS Classes/Workshops/Events

National Positive Thinking Day

☼ It’s National Positive Thinking Day! ☼

National Positive Thinking Day#OnePositiveThought

The Life is Good® apparel and accessories company conducted a survey this summer on optimism and positivity and ran a campaign leading up to today, National Positive Thinking Day. The goal was to “put more positivity into the world, one post at a time.” For every positive thought shared, Life is Good® donated $1 to the Life is Good Kids Foundation to support the men and women who dedicate their careers to helping children heal from the devastating impact of early childhood trauma.

Overall, the survey found that 75% of us are optimistic and 25% are pessimistic, and even though 54% feel negative about world affairs, 86% are still optimistic for the future.

Krishna Kumar Mishra, Department of Psychology, Banaras Hindu University, in Optimism as Predictor of Good Life, cited a 1985 study (Scheier and Carver) which states, “individuals who hold positive expectations for the future are assumed to believe that good things will occur in their lives, and tend to see desired outcomes as attainable and to persist in their goal-directed efforts. In contrast, individuals who hold negative outcome expectations for their future are assumed to expect bad things to happen, and tend to withdraw effort more easily,  become passive  and finally  to give  up on  achieving their  goals.”  Mishra’s own study of 426 participants “revealed that optimism was positively correlated with life satisfaction.”

Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC“One study highlighted how optimism or pessimism may affect, or even predict, your recovery from a major life event. Those who had a more positive outlook bounced back faster than those who did not,” according to Georgetown Medical Clinic. Additionally, optimists tend to, “Be more likely to practice preventive health measures because they believe their actions make a difference.”

Further, “Optimists tend to see setbacks as specific, temporary, and changeable. Because of this, they are motivated to take action. Non-optimists tend to look at setbacks as general, permanent, and hopeless—symptoms of widespread failure that cannot be changed or managed.”

Two statistics from the Life is Good® survey showed:

People who meditate are 9% more likely to be optismistic than those who don’t.

People who meditate are more optimisticPeople who exercise at least once a week are 41% more likely to be optimistic than those who don’t.People who exercise are more optimistic

Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NCThe Art of Living suggests the ability “to control our mind and keep it centered” is a “skill can be nurtured when we give our minds the time and space to decelerate and rest for a while.” The site suggests twenty minutes of meditation per day can facilitate this.

“The peace and happiness we access on our mats is no accident.

 

 

Although many write it off as just another exercise-induced dopamine high, yoga goes deeper than that. The mind-body connection created in yoga is thought to facilitate change at a cellular level.

When we weave positive intention into our movements, we are imprinting these thoughts, not only on our minds, but also on our bodies. We are effecting change on our mat that will allow for change off our mat,” states Caroline Layzell, in DoYouYoga.

Plus, “The more positive, blissful, and happy we are, the more sharp and alert we become,” according to Hengameh Fazeli, Gaia.com.

Arun Goel, Health and Yoga, that to develop positivism, we must embrace the concept of “Attitudinal” Yoga. According to this concept of yoga, the path to a positive attitude can be found through a 3-step approach, namely,

  • Awareness
  • Acceptance; and
  • Attitude

Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NCAt Sunrise Yoga, you will find the opportunity to reduce stress, to breathe freely, and to gain strength, flexibility, and peace of mind and as the Sunrise Yoga Studio logo suggests, we are about growth, balance, and peace. We want our studio, and ultimately your yoga practice, to find the mind, body, spirit connection that comes from the practice of yoga and meditation.

Life is Good® listed 10 reasons yoga is for optimists:

1. Celebrate – yoga celebrates little wins …maybe even just showing up to class or touching your toes!

2. Change your perspective – being upside down can flip a negative outlook right on its head.

3. Taking time to relax and unplug  – “me time” is so important to your well-being, and yoga can be that perfect time to shift your focus inward and do something good for yourself.

4. Improve your mood – Even optimists can find themselves in a bad mood – yoga is proven to improve and elevate your mood, especially through back bending poses like Bow or Wheel.

5. Breathing – Deep breathing that is done during yoga is one of the best and easiest stress relievers. It also helps to oxygenate the blood and awaken the brain. Doing some deep breathing exercises for just a few minutes can help reset your whole day.

6. Trying something new – shutting down the negative voice in your head that says you will fall if you try a new arm balance or try to tackle the crow pose. Shut off the “I don’t think I can do this” part of your brain and get to it.

7. Meditation – letting go of all thoughts, releasing negativity and tension, and creating new space for new opportunities.

8. Overcoming the impossible and conquering fears – sitting silently in stillness or diving into an impossible looking/challenging pose can be very scary! With consistent yoga practice things become possible, and can make you more resilient and prone to looking for the silver lining.

9. Healthy body – yoga helps to achieve fitness goals and improve health conditions in the body which leads to an overall better life.

10. Gratitude – yoga teaches you to live in the present and be grateful for what you have and what you can do now.

 

We have classes for all levels of experience in both yoga and meditation at Sunrise Yoga Studio. Celebrate National Positive Thinking Day by participating in a class and let’s spread a little more optimism and positivity into the world!Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC

Register for classes through the Sunrise Yoga app, online, or through the studio.

 

Use the hashtag #OnePositiveThoughtWithSYSYoga and share your thoughts with us!

In celebration of National Yoga Month, Sunrise Yoga is offering a FREE YOGA class for students NEW to Sunrise Yoga Studio on Saturday, September 22nd, 10:30-11:30 am! Attendees may also take advantage of a ONE DAY ONLY special offer! 30 Days of Yoga for $25! (Available only to those new to Sunrise Yoga. Must attend this class and must purchase in studio.)

 

National Yoga Month!

☼ September is National Yoga Month! ☼

National Yoga Month - Yoga at Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC

. . . of course, we think EVERY month should be National Yoga Month, but the Department of Health & Human Services has designated September as the time period to “educate about the health benefits of yoga and to inspire a healthy lifestyle (as stated by Yoga Health Foundation, a nonprofit organization, that fosters an awareness of yoga’s proven health benefits and provides individuals with actionable guidance and tools to enhance their own well-being).

Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NCYoga’s reputation is one of increasing flexibility, reducing back pain, and stress reduction. It has been used by Medical Professionals as part of a comprehensive program to lower risk of heart disease and can be an effective tool towards mindful eating, and weight management.Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC

 

 

 

 

A regular practice of yoga leads to healthier food choices in the appropriate amounts. You learn to listen to the body’s cues of hunger and satiety,” says Nova Southeastern University.

Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NCHealthCorps.org notes, “Back in 2008, the Department of Health and Human Services designated this month as National Yoga Awareness Month, one of a select number of yearly health calendar observances. During the first year of this designation, thousands of yoga enthusiasts participated in a ten-city yoga health festival tour that featured lectures, classes, music, entertainment, and exhibits. The movement has grown worldwide with global awareness campaigns helping to educate, inspire, and motivate people to adopt a healthier lifestyle with yoga being one possible core habit.”

On Saturday, September 22nd, Sunrise Yoga Studio will honor and celebrate National Yoga Month by offering a FREE yoga class for those NEW to Sunrise Yoga Studio.

Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC, National Yoga Month, Free Yoga ClassCelebrate National Yoga Month with the owner and director of Sunrise Yoga, Valerie Kiser, 10:30-11:30 am and take advantage of a One Day Only Special Offer of 30 Days of Yoga for $25! Students must attend this class and purchase in the studio only.

Create your account ahead of time online at SunriseYoga.net, using our Sunrise Yoga app, or come early and register at the studio!

At the close of National Yoga Month on September 30th, yogis around the world are encouraged to practice yoga at 7 p.m. in order to produce a “wave of yoga” across the globe. Let us know if you did the “yoga wave“!

If you have questions about National Yoga Month, about yoga in general, or about Sunrise Yoga Studio please email us at info@SunriseYoga.net.

Common Denominator

What is the common denominator of the following items?

☼ a classically trained dancer
☼ a computer programmer
☼ a group fitness coordinator
☼ a dog lover

Valerie Kiser, Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NCIf you said “yoga”, you would be at least partially correct! The common denominator is Sunrise Yoga Studio’s founder and owner, Valerie Kiser!

Long before yoga had entered Valerie’s mind, she was a classically trained dancer! But the dancer, a talent usually associated with a more creative nature, started her career after college in information technology as a computer programmer in the very structured world of banking.

So, how did this dancer/programmer find yoga (or perhaps the better question is how did yoga find Valerie?)? If you’ve been around Valerie more than once, you know that behind her calm and friendly demeanor is a brain that is moving at warp speed with an energy level to match! While still working as a programmer, Valerie was also serving as a group fitness coordinator and personal trainer at a local gym.

In between training sessions and aerobic classes, Valerie noticed the gym would soon be offering yoga classes. Sign me up, she thought! I’m flexible! I can do that! Valerie says she, like many, had the misconception that yoga was all about the poses and knew little about the full body, mind, spirit connection that is truly yoga.

After a brief hiccup . . . it’s tough to do yoga while recovering from an appendectomy . . . her yoga journey began. And what a journey it has been! She began teaching yoga in 1999 and is a YACEP (Yoga Alliance Continuing Education Provider) through The Yoga Alliance. She became a yoga therapist in 2006 as a natural progression of teaching yoga and her desire to help students on a more personal level.

Valerie’s love of learning, her love of yoga, and her desire to help others through health and well being, kept her going as she spent five years traveling from Clemmons to Arlington/Fairfax, VA, and back, all while still working full time as a computer programmer, to acquire her advanced teacher training and yoga therapeutics certifications.Valerie Kiser, yoga class, Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC

Valerie has completed a 1200-hour Advanced Teacher Training and Yoga Therapeutics certification from Sun and Moon Yoga Studios in Fairfax/Arlington, VA with JJ Gormley. Valerie is an IAYT-certified yoga therapist (C-IAYT). Valerie is also a Certified Prenatal Yoga instructor, a Relax and Renew Advanced Trainer ® (Restorative Yoga with Judith Lasater), an Ayurvedic Wellness Counselor, an Elise Browning Miller Yoga for Scoliosis Trainer and an iRest Teacher Level II (Yoga Nidra). Valerie teaches Cardiac Yoga ® (Cardiac Yoga is a registered trademark of M. Mala Cunningham, Ph.D. and is used with exclusive permission). Valerie is a 500-hour experienced registered yoga teacher (500 E-RYT) and YACEP (Yoga Alliance Continuing Education Provider) through the Yoga Alliance. Her first teacher training was completed with Cindy Dollar, an Iyengar-certified teacher in Asheville, NC.

Fifteen years ago, Valerie left behind the information technology profession and opened Sunrise Yoga Studio. At that time, Valerie was the entire staff, teaching in a single classroom. Now, not only does Valerie have a wonderful staff of instructors at Sunrise Yoga, and a beautiful, well-designed studio, she is also is also the director of the Sunrise Yoga Teacher Training Programs and offers 200 and 300-hour programs that are registered with Yoga Alliance and continuing education courses.

Jonathan and Valerie Kiser, Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NCAdditionally, Valerie is also the co-owner of ECYT (East Coast Yoga Therapy – an 815-hour program that certifies yoga therapists), a program designed to educate and empower yoga teachers in the art and science of Yoga Therapy as a means to promoting the health and well-being of yoga students. In June 2018, ECYT was awarded a Certificate of Accreditation through IAYT (The International Association of Yoga Therapists) and is 1 of 32 accredited schools in the world.

One might think it a bit crazy to ask what Valerie does when she isn’t working! If you have read this far, you might wonder when this dynamo sleeps!

Being the well-trained yogi that she is, Valerie follows the growth, balance, peace mindset (That’s even part of the Sunrise Yoga logo!). Valerie lives this out by enjoying being married to her husband, Jonathan (They’ve been married 20 years!), loving on their dogs, Casey and Louie, traveling and being outside. She recently took her first hot air balloon ride while on a trip to Arizona!Yoga Dogs, Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC

Valerie Kiser and her mom, Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons NCValerie is also fortunate to have her mom nearby and her mom is a Sunrise Yoga student. Taking classes six days a week, Frances is like daughter, like mother!

You can find Valerie at the studio . . . a LOT! Seriously, Valerie teaches all levels of classes from Chair Yoga to Level 4 Yoga, Cardiac Yoga® to Yoga Wall, and special classes like her Wednesday night Select Your Study Sessions. Find Valerie’s classes through the Sunrise Yoga app, online, or through the studio.

And does Valerie have a yoga weakness? Yes, ask her about backbends!Valerie Kiser, backbend, yoga, Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC

You can contact Valerie by emailing info@SunriseYoga.net.

It’s Time to Quit!

I think I need to quit yoga!

 

Flow Yoga at Sunrise Yoga, Clemmons, NC

What?!? You’ve practiced yoga for a month, a year, a decade, and you find yourself up against the “wall”. Not the yoga wall! The wall of progress. The wall of no improvement. The flat wall known as a plateau. Ugh!

Sunrise Yoga Studio Clemmons NCWe can hit a proverbial wall in many aspects of life. Career. Relationships. Parenting. Weight loss. Creativity. And, it’s easy to give up, quit, stop, throw in the towel, when that “wall” shows up. Your friends, maybe even your yoga instructor, will tell you to look at how far you’ve come, to consider how things would be if you didn’t practice yoga. But, you still feel like you’ve failed and there’s no future progression for you.

Guess what! You aren’t alone!

Jessica Stickler, writing for Wanderlust, says, ““How does one overcome plateaus in yoga practice?” I thought to myself, ‘I have no idea.’ The more I thought about the question, the more I doubted my ability to answer it. I have been practicing for a modest amount of time, around eight years or so (and teaching for seven of those!), so I have ducked, dodged, hail-mary’d, ignored, and confronted many a plateau.” She goes on to outline three ways she has overcome the “wall”: the bull (work on it EVERY SINGLE DAY), the fox (find a way around the difficulty and then come back to the initial spot of frustration), and the sloth (Just keep going!).

Plateaus are inevitable. In fact, they are evidence that you ARE practicing yoga! A “wall” or plateau may actually be a nudge to try something new or different or to approach your everyday routine and practice with new eyes/perspective.Beginner Yoga at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC

Senior Pure Yoga instructor, Sonja Rzepski, and Kay Kay Clivio, head of Pure Yoga’s teacher training program, recommend the following to push through a plateau:

1. Try a different style.
If your usual practice is a sweaty vinyasa, spend some time learning more about the logic of alignment in an Iyengar class, target your connective tissue and deep muscular release with Yin yoga, or try a new energetic approach with Kundalini yoga. Rzepski recommends sticking with it for four to six sessions before returning to your preferred or go-to classes. The idea is to look at your practice through a different lens, one that might trigger insights that will help you move past your plateau.

2. Book private sessions with your favorite teacher.
“Generally group classes are packed and there is no time for the breakdown of poses or to ask questions,” says Clivio. Getting closer to your source of inspiration will only make the fire of determination burn brighter. Three to six one-on-ones should be sufficient, per Rzepski, though you may want to continue them.

3. Explore the mind-body connection.
Asana (the physical practice of yoga) was originally conceived simply as a way to prepare the body for meditation. Try moving beyond the physical and explore the nuances of the breath or meditation (try the Headstrong meditations in the Equinox app). You can also learn more about the chakra system, the sister science of Ayurveda, or stack your nightstand with books on yoga philosophy. (Two Rzepski recommends: Light on Life by B.K.S. Iyengar and Healing Yoga by Loren Fishman.) “Learning more of the science of yoga can improve the depth of any practitioners postures,” says Clivio. “Not just seeing the postures as shapes and forms but a means to balance the energetic body.”

4. Dive deeper.
Move further into any aspect of the practice that inspires or challenges you. If you love inversions, take a workshop. Or, sign up for a retreat. This can give you renewed enthusiasm that will carry you past a plateau. Rzepski also recommends keeping a yoga journal to record and acknowledge your daily impressions and experiences. You may be making more progress than you think.

5. Get off your mat.
Karma yoga (the practice of service to others) is important, but often overlooked. Lose yourself in unselfish action by volunteering or simply look for opportunities for kindness and good deeds.

Yoga for Beginners at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NCA plateau or “wall” may be telling you your body needs a break. “Consider taking a few days off from the physical practice of yoga and allow your body to rest. This is a great time to explore the more mental and philosophical aspects of yoga, such as the yamas and niyamas,” says Karen Costa of doyoudoyoga.com. She also recommends “going deeper” . . . “if your yoga practice feels like it’s turned on cruise control, one of the best ways to shift that energy is to deepen your practice. Perhaps this is a sign that you’re ready to transition from being a student to becoming a teacher.”

With the variety of yoga classes offered at Sunrise Yoga, if you find yourself on that plateau, consider trying a different class or a different instructor. Add in some Quieting the Mind classes, or explore Valerie’s Select Your Study classes. Take Karen’s Level 2 Flow class to move your regular yoga class to a more fluid, musically driven practice. Join Bill Smith in his
Sound Immersion workshop. Visit with Valerie and other yoga instructors in the FREE information session and class for the upcoming Enrichment and Teacher Training sessions. Ask Valerie about one-on-one training. Try conquering the “wall” with yoga wall classes.

Your “wall” is a message to you. Be in tune with you. When you stop and let the “wall” speak to you, you will find that the wall was of your making all along.Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC

And, by the way, remember the “wall” you scaled to just get started with yoga? That “wall” was HUGE compared to the “wall” you think is in front of you now!

We are here to help. Send us your thoughts and/or questions to info@SunriseYoga.net.

Is Your Heart Making You Anxious?

“What’s good for the mind also tends to be good for the heart.”

Cardiac Yoga® Participant at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC

If you have had any heart issues, have you also had anxiety, particularly about being active with/after heart issues?

The American Heart Association says, “After any illness, it’s normal to feel afraid and unsure of the future. You may be scared because you don’t know what lies ahead, or because you feel less control over your life. Every heart patient has some degree of fear, but if your fear is overwhelming, it can prevent you from getting well and staying well.”

Additionally, the National Center for Biotechnology Information in a report on a clinical trial study noted, “Anxiety is highly prevalent among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), and there is growing evidence that high levels of anxiety are associated with worse prognosis. However, few studies have evaluated the efficacy of treating anxiety in CHD patients for reducing symptoms and improving clinical outcomes. Exercise and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to be effective in treating patients with depression, but have not been studied in cardiac patients with high anxiety.” They go on to state, “There is growing evidence that exercise may have beneficial effects on anxiety. Epidemiological studies have observed an inverse relationship between exercise and anxiety.”

And another study, this one by Jean-Christophe Chauvet-Gelinier, MD, PhD, and Bernard Bonin, MD, reported in Science Direct from the Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, offers “For rehabilitation to be effective in heart disease patients, they need to have a rather good psychological status.” And the Psychiatric Times underscores that “catch 22” with “Women and men with heart disease who perceive themselves as disabled and unable to perform their usual activities are three times more likely to report anxiety (Nickel et al., 1990). In a one-year prospective study of individuals with heart disease, Sullivan and colleagues (1997) explored associations of anxiety with self-reported physical function and activity interference. Findings indicated that those who report higher levels of anxiety also report higher levels of physical disability. High levels of anxiety affect functional status after heart surgery as well. In a randomized clinical trial with 156 participants, greater perceived tension/anxiety level at four weeks predicted decreased self-reported activity for both men and women (Ruiz et al., 1992). Relationships between anxiety and quality of life have also been empirically examined. Anxiety related to decreased functional ability after myocardial infarction has been found to substantially reduce quality of life among survivors and their families.”Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC, Cardiac Yoga®

Una McCann, M.D. is a psychiatrist and directs the Anxiety Disorders program at Johns Hopkins Medicine. She compares the reaction to a sudden heart attack as being like post-traumatic stress disorder:

• You’re likely to be shocked by your near-death experience and extremely hesitant to do the things you used to do.
• You might constantly relive the life-threatening event, and avoid the activity or place associated with the heart attack.
• Recurring anxious thoughts may impede your ability to get regular sleep.
• Your thoughts about what lies ahead may be extremely negative and cause a drastically foreshortened outlook of the future

She goes on to address anxiety management by saying, “The goal is to keep the patient from placing too much concentration on anxieties about the future that are impossible to control, and help the patient focus on the present. Anxiety management may encompass relaxation exercises, sensory focusing, and yoga techniques.”

Most heart patients are advised to exercise and be physically active because exercise can make the heart muscle stronger. The Cleveland Clinic, a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center, in their guide to the overall benefits of exercise for patients with heart failure suggest a combination of flexibility, cardiovascular/aerobic, and strength training. In their commentary on flexibility, they note, “This type of exercise involves slow movement to lengthen the muscles. Flexibility exercises include stretching, tai chi and yoga. They are also used before and after exercising to prevent injury and strain. Benefits include better balance, range of motion and better movement in your joints.”

There can be a large gap between being advised to be active and feeling confident enough in your health to actually become active. A heart patient may submit to cardiac rehabilitation because it is prescribed/mandated by the physician and occurs in a health services environment. But what happens after cardiac rehab ends? If any anxiety about physical ability exists, what options can a heart patient pursue for exercise and physical activity?

Before beginning any exercise program, please consult your physician, whether you are a heart patient or not. If your physician clears you to begin activity, we have a suggestion for you! There are many activities you could pursue, but, at Sunrise Yoga, we have a class geared specifically to with an existing heart condition and for those who are seeking increased heart wellness!Cardiac Yoga® participant at Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC, with Valerie Kiser, Certified Cardiac Yoga® Instructor

This class, held on Wednesdays from 11:30 am to 12:30 pm, is a gentle yoga class led by Valerie Kiser, owner and director of Sunrise Yoga and a certified instructor for Cardiac Yoga® (Cardiac Yoga® is a registered trademark of M. Mala Cunningham , Ph.D. and is used with exclusive permission.).

With Valerie at your side, you will practice yoga poses, breathing techniques, as well as mindfulness and relaxation. All of these activities are supported by information from the American Heart Association, and Harvard Health Publishing says, “What’s good for the mind also tends to be good for the heart.”

They continue, “The mind-calming practice of meditation may play a role in reducing your risk of heart disease, according to a scientific statement published in the Sept. 28, 2017, Journal of the American Heart Association. Experts reviewed dozens of studies published over the past two decades and found that meditation may improve a host of factors linked with heart disease — making it worth including in an overall program for ongoing heart care.”

Let Valerie guide you into a healthier heart, healthier you! Start with Cardiac Yoga® and, if you want more, Valerie can assist you in finding other Sunrise Yoga classes to suit your needs.

Cardiac Yoga® at Sunrise Yoga in Clemmons, NC

 

 

Questions? Email us at info@SunriseYoga.net!

Back Care Yoga

Sunrise Yoga Summer Healthy BackIt’s summer time and that can mean more physical activity . . . working in the yard, playing golf, chasing kids around, hauling the charcoal for the cookout, carrying the beach chairs, you name it! These are all activities that, with one wrong move can send your back into a not so good place.

According to the American Chiropractic Association, “Back pain is a fact of life for many people. Research shows that up to 80% of the population will experience back pain at some point during their lives. It is also the second most common reason for visits to the doctor’s office, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections.” Additionally, “as lifestyles have become more sedentary and the rate of obesity has risen, back pain has become increasingly prevalent, even among young children.”

Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC, Back Care YogaYour lumbar spine is made up of many complex parts . . . lumbar vertebra, facet joints, intervertebral discs, spinal nerves, and soft tissue . . . and a strain to any of these parts can cause back pain. The vertebra carry and distribute weight. The facet joints determine your flexibility and movement capability. Movement is absorbed by the intervertebral discs while the spinal nerves allow you to feel the movement. The soft tissue, ligaments, muscles, tendons and blood vessels, support the spine and ensure safe movement.

Maintaining a strong and healthy back is key to preventing back issues and the practice of yoga can aid in healthy back maintenance. “Many of the postures in yoga gently strengthen the muscles in the back, as well as the abdominal muscles. When these muscles are well conditioned, back pain can be greatly reduced or avoided,” says Deborah Metzger, Founder and Director of Princeton Center for Yoga & Health. “It is a system which balances strength and flexibility and addresses the whole body. Most people are tight in key areas affecting the spine, for example in the hips and shoulders, hamstrings and psoas. The spine may be compressed and back muscles tight or weak. A study in the December 20, 2005 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that yoga may be more likely to improve back function, ease chronic back pain, and reduce the need for pain medication than conventional exercise or reading a self-care book.”Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC, Back Care Yoga

Additionally, from EveryDayHealth.com, “According to research published in July 2017 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, yoga may even help reduce the need for pain medication. At the start of the three-month study, in which one group was assigned to physical therapy for their back pain, a second to yoga, and a third to reading about pain management strategies, 70 percent of the subjects were taking medication. By the end, however, while the number of people taking medication in the reading group stayed the same, only 50 percent of the yoga and physical therapy subjects were still taking it.” They also state, “Researchers are also starting to discover how yoga’s effects on the brain may contribute to decreased pain. In a study conducted by the National Institutes of Health and published in May 2015 in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, scientists found that there were significant differences between the brains of those with chronic pain and the brains of regular yoga practitioners. Those with chronic pain had less of the kind of brain tissue in the regions that help us tolerate pain, but those who did yoga had more — which suggests that yoga may be not just physically but neurologically protective.”

At Sunrise Yoga Studio, all of our classes address muscle strengthening but our Back Care Yoga class is specifically set up to address back health. Back Care Yoga is open to all levels of students, including those who have never taken a yoga class.

Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC, Back Care YogaIn our Back Care Yoga classes, students will learn poses to relieve muscle tension; safe poses to increase flexibility in the hips, shoulders and back; strengthening poses to give the spine and neck adequate support; ways to improve posture and alignment; and relaxation techniques to help reduce mental stress often associated with chronic pain. These classes are suitable for all practitioners, but special care is made to assist those with back issues. Overall emphasis is also placed on building a strong and healthy back for everyone, so as to avoid future back-related problems.

We want you to enjoy all kinds of activities all year long without the pain from back strain. If you are experiencing back pain, we ask that you see your doctor to make sure yoga is a good option for you. Once you have the approval from your doctor, sign up for a Back Care Yoga class and learn how to get your back in shape and keep it in shape.

Register for any Sunrise Yoga classes through our Sunrise Yoga app, online, or through the studio.

Questions about why yoga is good for your back? Email us at info@SunriseYoga.net. We want you to be informed!

Flow Yoga

Karen Hoglund teaches Flow Yoga at Sunrise Yoga, Clemmons, NCHave you wondered what Flow Yoga is all about? Have you tried it?

Yogapedia defines Flow Yoga, also known as Vinyasa Flow Yoga, as, “a style of yoga where the practitioner moves gracefully from one pose to the next and the class, or practice, becomes almost like a dance. Generally, each movement in to or out of a posture is made on an inhalation or exhalation, so the yoga unites the breath with the movement in a choreographed sequence. The flowing movements may be combined with some longer holds of certain postures.”

Flow Yoga at Sunrise Yoga, Clemmons, NCFlow classes string poses together to make a sequence. The sequence may be fixed, as in Ashtanga in which the poses are always done in the same order, but most of the time vinyasa teachers have the discretion to arrange the progression of poses in their own ways,” says Ann Pizer in her Introduction to Vinyasa Flow Yoga article on verywellfit.com.

Our expert in Flow Yoga at Sunrise Yoga Studio is Karen Hoglund. Karen’s creativity and love of music combine to create a fun but challenging Flow Yoga experience.

At Sunrise Yoga, Flow Yoga is offered every Saturday morning, 9:00-10:30 am, at the Level 2 experience level. It is a more aerobic style class that improves strength and endurance. In this class, the poses are linked together with the breath. There is much more fluid movement involved and thus, the pace in the class is quicker.Flow Yoga at Sunrise Yoga, Clemmons, NC

If you aren’t already in our Flow Yoga class at Sunrise Yoga, try adding this style of class to your practice. You can register for the class through the Sunrise Yoga app, online, or through the studio.

Questions about Flow Yoga? Email us at info@sunriseyoga.net to get more information. We would love to hear from you!

☼ FREE Yoga? ☼

FREE Yoga through Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NCThis week, someone asked why our Namasté the Market Way class is free. Sunrise Yoga offers this 45 minute free monthly class during the spring and summer at the Clemmons Village Farmers Market, a pretty cool place to hang out and find local vendors with some great products. Namaste the Market Way, Free Yoga, Village of Clemmons Farmers Market, Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC

Perhaps it seemed odd to offer yoga at a farmers market? Does offering the class free somehow lessen its legitimacy? Did free mean it wasn’t led by a qualified instructor?

Whatever the reason for the question, we hope it indicated interest in the class and in giving yoga a try! For those who have stepped into the world of yoga, having easy access to yoga classes, free or not, makes it possible to deepen the practice, and broaden the understanding that yoga goes far beyond physical movement and body flexibility. If a free yoga class can help another person connect to yoga, we are all for it!

FREE Yoga through Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NCThose unfamiliar with Sunrise Yoga Studio may not realize we frequently offer free yoga classes. By offering our free Namasté the Market Way yoga class at the Clemmons Village Farmers Market, we get to connect with and give back to the community who has so positively supported us for the 15 years we have been in Clemmons. We have the opportunity to get to know our neighbors as well as support other local businesses. And if Mother Nature cooperates, we take the yoga outdoors for the added benefit of some good old vitamin D!

 

If outdoor yoga isn’t your thing but you are curious about yoga and want to learn more, our next free session at the studio will occur Thursday, June 21st, from 9:30-10:30 am. In celebration of International Yoga Day, students NEW to Sunrise Yoga can enjoy this class at no charge! (And, pssssst, that day, only at the studio, you can purchase our New Student Special of 30 Days of Unlimited Yoga for only $25! That’s a $5 savings off the regular purchase price!! For less than the price of 2 drop-in classes, you can attend daily practice in all on-going, scheduled classes for 30 consecutive days. This does exclude “series” classes and special events.)

At Sunrise Yoga, we live the values of yoga! Yoga teaches us the importance of helping others. In addition to offering free yoga classes, we support and participate in our community through activities and donations to the Clemmons Food Pantry (Remember the Drive Away Hunger Golf Tournament, which Sunrise Yoga helps sponsor, is tomorrow, June 1st!), American Red Cross, For Katie’s Sake/Winston-Salem Foundation, National MS Society, American Heart Association, Second Harvest Food Bank, Make A Wish, SECU Family House, Arts for Life, and Senior Services of Forsyth County. Since 2004, we have raised over $33,000 and thousands of pounds of food and other items to support these local charities.

So, come take a free yoga class as they are offered, give yoga a try, and directly or indirectly, you too will be connected to our community!FREE Yoga through Sunrise Yoga Studio, Clemmons, NC

Want to stay connected to Sunrise Yoga? Download our app from the Apple App Store or through Google Play. You can also sign up for our monthly newsletter to learn when special events like free classes are scheduled. Email us at info@sunriseyoga.net to subscribe.

Chair Yoga

The person in the image above is obviously an experienced yoga enthusiast and may be how many unfamiliar with yoga visualize what a yoga enthusiast should look like.

Chair Yoga Participant at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NCThe person in the image above is also a yoga enthusiast. She may not perform the same poses as the person in the first image, but she’s a yogi, nonetheless.

Yoga can be made accessible for just about anybody and any body. At Sunrise Yoga, Chair Yoga is offered twice per week so that even those with special health conditions have access to yoga classes. According to Wikipedia, “It (Chair Yoga) is in the process of being recognized formally as a type of yoga distinct from other types, such as Iyengar Yoga or Ashtanga yoga,” an indication that the need for this level of yoga exists. Chair Yoga Participant at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC

Chair yoga is a gentle form of yoga that can be done sitting on a chair or standing on the ground while using the chair for support,” says Kate Dusek, CHWC, LRT, in healthysetgo.com. She continues with, “It is beneficial for people with limited mobility and for those who want to practice yoga at their workplace.” So, while Chair Yoga in the studio may be for those unable to participate in other class levels, Chair Yoga can be beneficial for anyone who sits for extended periods of time and for those who simply want to work in a bit more yoga outside of the routine yoga practice!

Chair Yoga Participant at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC

 

 

 

 

At Sunrise Yoga, Chair Yoga classes are appropriate for those with special health conditions, those who want a slower paced class, or those who are looking for a beginner level class. The class is appropriate to students who use walkers, canes, and wheelchairs.

Most of the class activity is performed seated in a chair. For those who are able, some standing (with support) and floor movements may be given. For those who are unable, alternate poses appropriate for remaining seated will be given.

 

Joanne Spence, BSW, E-RYT 200, RYT 500 and RCYT, writing for Yoga Alliance, lists 10 reasons for trying Chair Yoga:

10. Chairs don’t take up much floor space.
9. Chairs are easy to come by.
8. Chairs are accessible to anyone who can sit.
7. The quality and range of movement one can achieve from sitting in a chair is surprising.
6. A chair can be a great prop.
5. Chairs are a great aid to posture.
3. Chairs slow you down.
2. Using a chair is humbling. Practicing in one is good for the ego.
1. Using a chair allows REAL people to do REAL yoga.

“The chair replaces the yoga mat and becomes an extension of your body allowing you to take full advantage of yoga’s amazing fitness and health potential,” notes Lakshmi Voelker, founder of Get Fit Where You Sit™. The key is to work with your body where and how your body exists.

Those who participate in Chair Yoga may see improved range of motion and flexibility, involvement in a social activity, strengthened muscles and joints, and reduced stress. The classes at Sunrise Yoga include yoga poses for the body, breathing exercises, and relaxation techniques.Chair Yoga Participants at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC

Do you know someone who could benefit from Chair Yoga? Encourage them to visit Sunrise Yoga and try a class! It may change more than you might imagine!

Contact us at info@sunriseyoga.net if you have questions and/or if you need additional information.

Beginner Yogi?

When you were a beginner yogi (yesterday, a year ago, a decade ago??), what did you know about yoga and yoga poses? Did you have any familiarity with yoga poses, yoga terminology, yoga “etiquette”?

(Be sure to read to the end for a special offer for new yoga students!)

Beginner Yoga at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC

 

Simply mentioning yoga to someone who has never experienced yoga can send a message of fear and intimidation to someone unfamiliar with yoga. What do you remember about your first yoga experience?

In her article, 10 Things to Know Before Your First Yoga Class, Lizzie Fuhr notes, “Revered in a yoga practice, the idea of a “beginner’s mind” means heading to your mat with no preconceived notions about what you can or can’t accomplish or poses you can or can’t do. Keeping this positive outlook and leaving expectations at the door will result in the best experience possible.”

Yoga for Beginners at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC

Yoga for Beginners at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NCYoga for Beginners at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC

Listed below are yoga poses recommended for beginners (New York Times (Kelly Couturier); doyouyoga.com (Kristin McGee); food.ndtv.com (Shivangana Vasudeva)).

What do you think? Would you have recommended differently?

• MountainBeginner Yoga at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC
• Child’s Pose
• Downward Facing Dog
• Plank
• Warrior 1
• Warrior 2
• Seated Forward Bend
• Four-Limbed Staff
• Cobra
• Tree
• Triangle
• Chair
• Boat
• Seated Half-Spinal Twist
• Bridge
• Corpse
• Sukhasna

If you are now practicing yoga, you obviously overcame any difficulties, challenges, or misconceptions about yoga after your first class. How was your first experience different from what you thought it would be?

Beginner Yoga at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC

Beginner Yoga at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC

Cathy Howe, Sunrise Yoga Instructor, demonstrates the half moon yoga pose using a yoga block.

 

“Some will tell you that yoga is too slow and boring instead it is an intense and holistic exercise. This ancient form of fitness with roots in India focuses on developing balance, strength and flexibility. Don’t let anyone misguide you as these are all consequences of practicing yoga and not prerequisites. No one expects you to master the poses on the very first day. Yoga is all about pushing past your body’s limits over time,” says Shivangana Vasudeva, NDTV.

 

 

Beginner Yoga at Sunrise Yoga Studio in Clemmons, NC

Classes are available at Sunrise Yoga for those just beginning their exploration of yoga and for experienced students who wish to broaden and expand their practice. Each class contains yoga poses of the body, breathing practices, meditation, and relaxation. You and your instructor will develop a personalized approach to each pose creating a greater awareness of your body and mind in motion and in stillness. You are encouraged to work at your own pace honoring your limitations and abilities. Our staff is welcoming and highly trained to guide you through your yoga journey.

Sunrise Yoga has many classes appropriate for those new to yoga. Visit the Sunrise Yoga web site to see all the opportunities to move your yoga practice from an “I should do that!” stance to “I practice yoga!” stance. Our instructors are all trained and certified to help any level student.
Want to know more? Email us at info@sunriseyoga.net, call the studio at 336-778-1233, or visit us at 6000 Meadowbrook Mall Ct #1, Clemmons, NC 27012.

PLUS . . . We have a special offer for new students!

30 Days of Unlimited Yoga for $30

We recommend all new students buy our low-priced unlimited 30 days of yoga on your first visit to our studio. It’s a great bargain! For less than the price of 2 drop-in classes, you can attend daily practice in all on-going, scheduled classes for 30 consecutive days. This does exclude “series” classes and special events.

Come join us!!!